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Arizona: Killer’s execution not botched

  • NEW: Director of the Arizona Department of Corrections defends execution
  • Media witnesses say Arizona murderer Joseph Wood gasped intensely
  • His attorneys tried to halt execution more than halfway through and have Wood revived
  • New drug combinations in lethal injections have sparked controversy

CNN's original series "Death Row Stories" explores America's capital punishment system at 10 p.m. ET/PT Sundays on CNN. Join the conversation about the death penalty at facebook.com/cnn or Twitter @CNNorigSeries using #DeathRowStories.

(CNN) -- Joseph Wood gasped and struggled to breathe during his nearly two-hour execution involving a novel combination of drugs, some witnesses say.

His last breaths were like "a fish on shore gulping for air," reporter Troy Hayden said. Wood's attorneys tried to stop the execution more than halfway through, with one calling it "bungled" and "botched."

State officials and his victims' relatives disagreed, saying Wood snored and didn't appear to suffer.

Reports that the execution was botched are "erroneous," Charles Ryan, director of the Arizona Department of Corrections, said Thursday.

Wood was comatose and never in pain during his execution, Ryan said. The director said: "The record clearly shows the inmate was fully and deeply sedated ... three minutes after the administration of the execution drugs."

Suffering or not, Wood's death Wednesday afternoon took too long, Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer said, and she has ordered the state's Department of Corrections to review it.

Wood's slow death is fueling a debate stirred up as states look for new drug combinations for lethal injections, thanks in part to pharmaceutical companies' decisions to withhold or stop making drugs used in the past.

"It took Joseph Wood two hours to die, and he gasped and struggled to breathe for about an hour and 40 minutes. We will renew our efforts to get information about the manufacturer of drugs as well as how Arizona came up with the experimental formula of drugs it used today," attorney Dale Baich said in a statement.

He added, "Arizona appears to have joined several other states who have been responsible for an entirely preventable horror -- a bungled execution."

One of the victims' relatives had a strongly different view -- that he didn't suffer, and that he got what he deserved.

"I don't believe he was gasping for air; I don't believe he was suffering. It sounded to me like was snoring," said the relative, Jeanne Brown.

"You don't know what excruciating is. What's excruciating is seeing your dad laying there in a pool of blood, seeing your sister laying there in a pool of blood. This man deserved it. And I shouldn't really call him a man," she said.

The state used midazolam, an anesthetic, and hydromorphone, a narcotic painkiller that, with an overdose, halts breathing and stops the heart from beating. It's one of the new combinations that states have tried -- with some controversial results -- after manufacturers based or operating in Europe stopped U.S. prisons from using their drugs in executions.

Opinion: I was 17, on death row -- and innocent

The execution began at 1:52 p.m. (4:52 p.m. ET) Wednesday and concluded, with Wood being pronounced dead, at 3:49 p.m. (6:49 p.m. ET).

Wood, convicted of murder and assault in the 1989 deaths of his estranged girlfriend and her father, objected to the drug combination in courts, arguing that it was experimental, that it would not put him out completely and that it would violate constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment.

The Arizona Supreme Court briefly delayed Wednesday's execution to consider his last-ditch request before denying it. The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to intervene.

Arizona execution raises questions over novel lethal injections

A federal judge ordered local officials to preserve all physical evidence in Wood's execution.

"One thing is certain, however: Inmate Wood died in a lawful manner and by eyewitness and medical accounts he did not suffer," the governor said. "This is in stark comparison to the gruesome, vicious suffering that he inflicted on his two victims -- and the lifetime of suffering he has caused their family."

Lawyers rush to save him after injection

The Corrections Department said it followed protocol, affirming Wood's "deep sedation" seven times before he was pronounced dead.

Aside from snoring, he did not grimace or otherwise move, the department said.

But as the clock ticked, Wood's attorneys filed an emergency motion to stop the execution and save his life. He was "gasping and snorting for more than an hour," they said.

"He is still alive," the motion read. "This execution has violated Mr. Wood's Eighth Amendment right to be executed in the absence of cruel and unusual punishment."

Attorney Baich said the room was silent as Wood gasped. "I have witnessed 10 executions, and I had never seen that before," he said.

Baich blasted Brewer over her assessment and called for an independent investigation.

Witness: Execution 'was tough for everybody'

Michael Kiefer, a reporter for The Arizona Republic, said this execution was unlike the other four he has witnessed.

"Usually it takes about 10 minutes, the person goes to sleep. This was not that," he told other reporters afterward. "It started off looking as if it was going all right but then obviously something didn't go right. It took two hours."

Kiefer described the sound Wood made as a "deep, snoring, sucking air sound."

Hayden, a media witness from KSAZ-TV in Phoenix, told reporters the execution was difficult to watch. He likened Wood's breathing to a "fish gulping for air."

"It was tough for everybody in that room," he said.

Opinion: 5 ways to improve the U.S. death penalty

Drug combination controversy

As with executions in other states with new lethal drug combinations, many of the objections have centered on the drugs themselves.

Defense attorney Baich vowed to look into how Arizona came up with the "experimental formula of drugs it used."

The American Civil Liberties Union joined in his outrage.

"It's time for Arizona and the other states still using lethal injection to admit that this experiment with unreliable drugs is a failure," it said in a statement.

It called for Arizona and other states to prove the reliability of the drugs or stop the executions.

Some drugs hard to come by now

The quarrel over the drugs used in lethal injections is not new.

Executions have commonly been carried out with a combination of three drugs -- an anesthetic to render the inmate unconscious, followed by a paralyzing agent to keep him or her from flailing, then a third drug to kill the inmate, often potassium chloride to halt the heart.

The commonly used anesthetic was once sodium thiopental, which can also be used for surgical anesthesia.

Its sole U.S. manufacturer, Hospira, based in Illinois, suspended its production in 2009 and ended it for good in 2011. The company said it had never intended it to be used in lethal injections. European manufacturers of the same drug refuse to export it to the United States for the same reason.

Some states then looked to pentobarbital, a powerful anesthetic commonly used to euthanize animals. But that drug has been hard to come by since 2011, when Lundbeck, its Denmark-based manufacturer, said it would do its best to keep the drug from U.S. execution programs.

Controversies in Oklahoma, Ohio

New drug combinations were a focus of controversial executions this year in Oklahoma and Ohio.

Oklahoma put executions on hold after the death of inmate Clayton Lockett in April. Midazolam was part of the injection combination, and it took 43 minutes for him to die, Oklahoma officials said.

While state officials said Lockett was unconscious the entire time, a media witness for CNN affiliate KFOR-TV in Oklahoma City said he uttered the words, "Man," "I'm not," and "something's wrong" before blinds to the execution chamber were closed. His attorney, Dean Sanderford, said the inmate's body twitched and convulsed before he died.

The state Department of Corrections said an "exploded" vein was part of the problem.

"There was some concern at that time that the drugs were not having the effect. So the doctor observed the line and determined that the line had blown," said Robert Patton, director of the Oklahoma Department of Corrections.

In January, Ohio used a midazolam-hydromorphone combination to execute convicted murderer and rapist Dennis McGuire. It took 24 minutes for him to die, and he appeared to gasp and convulse for 10 to 13 minutes, Columbus Dispatch reporter Alan Johnson said.

Ohio's correction department said it had wanted to use pentobarbital, but it ran out of its supply in September.

Combining new drugs in lethal injections may have sparked controversy, but the use of the old drug combination that included sodium thiopental was also not fail-safe, medical critics have said.

It is possible that executions were quicker and inmates flailed less with the old combination, but they may have been conscious as they experienced their executions, some critics say.

The real question to some is not if a specific drug is responsible for suffering, but if the method of execution itself is.

Mississippi mother swaps death row for jail cell to await trial

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California's death penalty ruled unconstitutional

CNN's Mayra Cuevas, Dave Alsup, Ross Levitt and Michael Pearson contributed to this report.

Tornado hits campground; 2 die

  • NEW: The National Weather Service confirms an F1 tornado in Virginia
  • NEW: Police say a Jersey City, New Jersey couple died when a tree fell on their tent
  • NEW: 36 people were hospitalized, including the son of the slain couple
  • Photos show overturned campers and a downed tree on one vehicle

(CNN) -- The voices in the video tell the story.

"Something crazy is going on outside," a woman shouts. "I'm scared."

Moments later, the same voice yells that a tree has fallen and another says, "It's on that guy's camper."

Overturned campers, downed trees

The footage posted on the website of CNN affiliate WAVY came from the Cherrystone Family Camping Resort on the Chesapeake Bay in Virginia, where a tornado on Thursday toppled campers and sent trees crashing onto vehicles.

State Police spokeswoman Corinne Geller said a New Jersey couple died when a tree fell on their tent and 36 people were hospitalized -- including the couple's 13-year-old son. He was in critical condition.

She identified the fatalities as Lord Balatbat and Lolabeth Ortega, both 38, of Jersey City.

According to Geller, more than 1,300 people were staying at the campground and police have accounted for all of them, plus 40 Cherrystone staff members.

Photos from the scene in Northampton County showed overturned campers, with a downed tree crushing one vehicle.

The area was under a tornado warning, and Danielle Rivera -- who shot the video footage -- told WAVY of giant hail and crushing winds that tore off the awning of her family's camper.

"I was terrified"

"I was terrified," the 17-year-old Rivera said. "I was so scared."

She and her mother decided to stay in the camper until the hail and wind relented enough for them to make a dash to their car.

"I thought a tree was going to fall on us," she said.

Survivors were bused to a local high school set up as a temporary shelter, and workers made sure the devastated campground was safe before allowing anyone to return, Geller said.

The injured were taken to four different medical centers, with most going to Riverside Shore Memorial Hospital, she said.

Tornado warning

According to the National Weather Service, a cluster of "supercells" ahead of a cold front formed a storm over Chesapeake Bay just after 8 a.m. ET.

The storm intensified as it moved on ashore about 30 minutes later. The area was under a tornado warning issued at 8:20 a.m., and Geller said the weather service confirmed that an F1 tornado hit the campground.

An F1 tornado has wind speeds of 73-112 mph.

Cherrystone opened in 1964 occupies 300 acres with 725 sites including cabins, cottages, and deluxe campers, its website says. Geller told reporters that the tornado appeared to come off the water and hit the campground. It also knocked over a tractor-trailer on a nearby road, injuring the driver, she said.

All the other damage and injuries occurred at the campground, Geller said, adding that most of those sent to hospitals had been treated and released.

Rivera told WAVYthat she and her family had been going there for 10 years, but "never have I ever witnessed anything this bad."

Obama weighs sending National Guard

  • The Obama administration weighs sending National Guard tropps to the U.S.-Mexico border
  • Congressional Democrats and Republicans have competing border crisis plans
  • The president is meeting with Central American leaders this week to discuss border crisis
  • The Obama administration is buoyed by slight slowing in immigrant kids at the border

Washington (CNN) -- The Obama administration, after initially resisting the idea, is weighing whether to deploy National Guard troops to the southern border to help address a surge of migrant youth from Central America, many of them unaccompanied, a White House official told CNN.

The Pentagon and the Department of Health and Human Services sent a team earlier this week to assess Border Patrol efforts in the Rio Grande Valley, the official said, where tens of thousands of children have poured into the United States this year.

The administration's latest efforts in what most agree is a humanitarian crisis come as Washington struggles to address the matter with little optimism for a solution before Congress breaks for its month-long August recess.

Immigration protestors gather in Kansas
Humanitarian crisis ... in America?
Breaking through the immigration rhetoric

Immigrants or refugees?

Here's the latest:

Little optimism for a solution from Congress: House Speaker John Boehner accuses President Barack Obama of being "AWOL" on the crisis and flip-flopping on solutions.

A key partisan point of contention is a Republican proposal to change a 2008 law that allows Central American immigrant children to stay in the United States until they receive a hearing. That process can take months or years.

Republicans want to tweak the Bush-era law so that migrant youth from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador, who do not qualify for refugee status, are sent home more quickly.

Democrats worry the expedited process will mean many will fall through the cracks and will be sent back to what many have characterized as violent situations in their countries.

"The administration started earlier this month by signaling some openness to changes in the 2008 law to accelerate the process of returning these children to their home countries," Boehner told reporters on Thursday. "The President called for this change, the secretary of homeland security called for this change, and other administration officials have called for this change. Now the President and his team have apparently flip-flopped."

House Republicans proposed a $1.5 billion package on Wednesday aimed at helping to resolve the crisis.

The tally is nearly $1 billion less than that proposed in a measure by Senate Democrats just a day before and less than half of the $3.7 billion Obama has said he needs to effectively combat the problem.

However, top congressional leaders from both parties say they doubt Congress will act before beginning its recess. Time to do something is also short when they get back in September due to the upcoming midterm elections in November.

Meanwhile, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-California, and members from the Texas congressional delegation were to meet with officials from the Rio Grande Valley and the Brownsville office of Catholic Charitieson on Thursday to discuss the problem.

White House reconsidering National Guard: The White House has not embraced calls from Republicans and even some Democrats to send guard troops to the border with Mexico. President Barack Obama suggested, in a conversation with Texas Gov. Rick Perry earlier this month, that it could be a temporary solution.

Perry followed up this week, announcing he would deploy up to 1,000 guard troops to the border area most affected by the surge -- the Rio Grande Valley.

A White House official told CNN there had been no request from homeland security officials for such a step, but that the Pentagon would make the call, if asked for help.

Gil Kerlikowske, commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection told CNN's "New Day" on Thursday the administration is "very pleased" and optimistic with conditions" at the border.

Kerlikowske also noted that the flow of migrant youth has slowed, but also said that is a usual occurrence in hotter parts of the summer.

Central American leaders in the U.S.: Guatemalan President Otto Perez Molina and Honduran President Juan Orlando Hernandez are slated to speak at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a nonprofit, foreign policy think tank, on Thursday about ways to stem the from of immigrant kids.

Molina and Hernandez, along with El Salvadoran President Salvador Sanchez Ceren, are scheduled to meet with President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden on Friday.

Bush calls on Republicans to fix the problem: Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, a possible 2016 Republican presidential candidate, wrote an opinion piece in the Wall Street Journal asking fellow Republicans not abandon comprehensive immigration reform and asking for the affected immigrant children to be treated more compassionately when they are taken into custody. His piece echoes themes in a similar statement last week to CNN.

"President Obama has promised to once again act unilaterally if Congress fails to take up immigration reform," Bush wrote. "Now is the time for House Republicans to demonstrate leadership on this issue. Congress should not use the present crisis as an excuse to defer comprehensive immigration reform."

Key questions about Rick Perry's border plan

Kevin Liptak and Deirdre Walsh contributed to this report.

Affleck’s ‘Batman’ makes appearance

Ben Affleck stars as Batman in 2016's
Ben Affleck stars as Batman in 2016's "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice."
  • A close-up photo of Ben Affleck's Batman was shared at Comic-Con
  • It was part of a montage celebrating the hero's 75th anniversary
  • Affleck is playing Batman in "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice"
  • The movie will arrive May 6, 2016

(CNN) -- Attendees at 2014's San Diego Comic-Con have gotten up close and personal with Ben Affleck's Batman.

On Thursday, DC Comics gave the first close-up look at Affleck's caped hero, offering a profile photo of the newest Bruce Wayne as part of a montage honoring Batman's 75th anniversary.

First look at Ben Affleck in 'Batman vs. Superman'

In addition to the close-up photo, Affleck's cape and cowl from the upcoming "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" has been seen on the SDCC floor.

Henry Cavill suits up for 'Batman v Superman'

Affleck himself hasn't been spotted, but he's probably busy with director Zack Snyder's production schedule. Work on "Batman v Superman" is under way, with plans to shoot in Detroit and international locales.

Also starring Henry Cavill as Superman, Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman, Jesse Eisenberg as Lex Luthor and Amy Adams as Lois Lane, Snyder's "Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice" will open May 6, 2016.

Darth Car unveiled at Comic-Con

Cosplay at Comic-Con: Who wore it best?

Chief Ebola doctor contracts Ebola

  • Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan is being treated in Kailahun, Sierra Leone
  • The Ministry of Health took to Facebook to deny reports the doctor died
  • Khan had been overseeing Ebola treatment and isolation units

(CNN) -- A doctor who has played a key role in fighting the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone is infected with the disease, according to that country's Ministry of Health.

Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan is being treated by the French aid group Medicins Sans Frontieres -- also known as Doctors Without Borders -- in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, Tim Shenk, an agency spokesman, told CNN.

Until falling ill, Khan had been overseeing Ebola treatment and isolation units at Kenema Government Hospital, about 185 miles east of the capital Freetown.

Citing patient confidentiality, Shenk declined to provide additional details about Khan's condition.

Cultural practices aiding Ebola spread
Fighting Ebola in urban Africa
Ebola outbreak not under control
Doctors work to isolate Ebola outbreak

The Ministry of Health took to Facebook to deny reports the doctor had died.

The ministry "wishes the general public and all partners working in the healthcare sector to know that Dr. (Shiek) Umar Khan is still alive and responding to treatment contrary to social media report of his demise," according to a Facebook post.

Sanjay Gupta: 'It only took moments'

Sierra Leone has had 427 confirmed cases of Ebola and 144 deaths, according to figures released Wednesday by the health ministry.

That puts it, along with Guinea, at the center of an outbreak of the virus that has steadily spread through western Africa since it began earlier this year. More than 1,000 people have contracted Ebola in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia, according to the World Health Organization.

Ebola typically kills 90% of those infected, but the death rate in this outbreak has dropped to roughly 60% thanks to early treatment.

What is Ebola, and why does it kill?

Officials believe that the Ebola outbreak has taken such a strong hold in West Africa due to the proximity of the jungle -- where the virus originated -- to Conakry, which has a population of 2 million. Since symptoms don't immediately appear, the virus can easily spread as people travel around the region. Once the virus takes hold, many die in an average of 10 days as the blood fails to clot and hemorrhaging occurs.

The disease isn't contagious until symptoms appear. Symptoms include fever, headache and fatigue. At that point, the Ebola virus is spread via bodily fluids.

Get the fast facts on Ebola

Health workers are at especially high risk, since they are in close contact with infected people and their bodily fluids. Adding to the danger, in the initial stages of infection doctors may mistake an Ebola infection for another, milder illness.

Aside from his work on Ebola, Khan also serves as the lead physician of the hospital's Lassa Fever Program, another fearsome tropical disease. The hospital's official biography page states Khan took on that job when his predecessor died of Lassa Fever.

I survived Ebola, but villagers shunned me

Condemned woman leaves Sudan

  • Mariam Yehya Ibrahim and her family meet Pope Francis, thank him for his prayers
  • Francis thanks Ibrahim and her family for their "courageous constant witness to faith"
  • Ibrahim and her family will be in Italy for a short time before traveling on to the United States
  • "Today is a day for celebration," says Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi

Rome (CNN) -- Mariam Yehya Ibrahim, the Sudanese Christian woman sentenced to death in Sudan because of her faith, arrived in Rome on Thursday, the Italian Foreign Ministry said.

Ibrahim "will remain in Italy for a short time and then will travel on to the United States," the ministry said.

Sudanese authorities had said Ibrahim was guilty of rejecting Islam in favor of Christianity, but her conviction for "apostasy" and adultery was overturned last month on appeal, following weeks of international controversy.

After her release, she and her husband, American Daniel Wani, were detained for two days, accused of falsifying travel documents after going to the airport in Sudan's capital, Khartoum. They were trying to fly to the United States with their baby daughter, who was born while Ibrahim was in prison, and toddler son.

Now their dream of starting a new life in the United States appears to be on the verge of becoming reality.

Not only that, but Ibrahim and her family met with Pope Francis at his private residence in Domus Santa Marta in Vatican City.

During the meeting Thursday, which lasted about half an hour, Ibrahim thanked the Pope for his and the Roman Catholic Church's support and prayers, the Vatican said.

He, in turn, thanked Ibrahim and her family for their "courageous witness and constancy of faith."

Francis also played with the children, 18-month-old Martin and 2-month-old Maya, and greeted the Italian diplomats involved in her journey to Italy.

With this gesture, the Vatican said, the Pope "desired to show his closeness, attention and prayer also to all those who suffer for their faith, in particular to Christians who are enduring persecution or limitations imposed upon their religious freedom."

Ibrahim has said that her mother, an Ethiopian Orthodox Christian, raised her as a Christian.

She remained steadfast in her faith despite the threat of a death sentence, saying at her sentencing hearing in May: "I am a Christian, and I will remain a Christian."

'Day for celebration'

Sudanese Christian fears for her life
Sudanese Christian woman rearrested
Christian woman free from death sentence
Brother: If she refuses, 'execute her'

Ibrahim and her family were earlier greeted at the airport in Rome by Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi.

In a brief statement to reporters at the airport, Renzi said, "Today we are very happy. ... Today is a day for celebration."

Speaking alongside him, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs Lapo Pistelli said Ibrahim and her children were well and in "excellent condition."

He said Pope Francis had been informed Wednesday by the Prime Minister that the family was coming to Italy, and that the government had worked to bring about a meeting between them.

"Mariam and her two children will have important meetings in the following days and then they will travel to the United States."

How Italy helped

Pistelli said Italy had become involved in the case because, as a Catholic country, it was very moved by Ibrahim's story and wanted to help.

Italy has good relations with Khartoum and offered to help the U.S. Embassy there to speed up the process of getting U.S. passports for Ibrahim and her family to leave the country, the minister said.

Pistelli said he had traveled to Sudan two weeks ago to start the process but it was not finalized until Wednesday night.

He posted an image to his Facebook page of himself with Ibrahim and the two children, apparently taken on board the plane shortly before their arrival in Rome. "Mission accomplished," he wrote.

Ibrahim, her husband and their two children are now in a protected government house, he said. It is unclear how long Ibrahim will stay in Rome before flying on to the United States, he said, adding that it had to do with passport procedures.

CNN has not yet been able to reach the U.S. Embassy or the Sudanese Foreign Ministry for comment.

Persecution claim

Ibrahim's ordeal began when one of her relatives, a Muslim, filed a criminal complaint saying her family was shocked to find out she had married Wani, a Christian, after she was missing for several years.

A Sudanese court considered Ibrahim a Muslim because her father was Muslim. She was charged with adultery, because a Muslim woman's marriage to a Christian man is illegal in Sudan. She was also charged with apostasy, accused of illegally renouncing what was alleged to be her original faith.

She insists she has never been a Muslim -- and says she was persecuted as a Christian while in prison.

Convicted when she was about eight months pregnant, she gave birth two weeks later while shackled.

On Monday, a Sudanese Islamic jihadi group which has previously claimed an attack on a Sudanese journalist released a statement threatening Ibrahim.

The group vowed to carry out what it said was the justified death sentence against Ibrahim that was repealed by a higher court.

Amid this threatening environment, Daniel Wani told CNN that his family had reported seeing unknown people outside their old residence in Khartoum. Their numbers had been increasing over the past few days, he said.

READ: Sudanese Christian woman: 'There's a new problem every day'

READ: Exclusive: Sudan apostasy woman's 'brother' says she should repent or die

READ: Why marrying for love should never mean death

CNN's Hada Messia reported from Rome and Nima Elbagir from Khartoum, while Laura Smith-Spark wrote in London.

‘Scammers’ won’t leave Airbnb house

  • Airbnb guests at a California condo have refused to leave
  • The now-unwanted guests have tenant rights under California law
  • Condo owner's initial appeals to Airbnb met with no success
  • Owner has since hired lawyer and received assistance from Airbnb

(CNN) -- If the old saw about houseguests being like fish is true -- after a few days they begin to stink -- imagine what it must smell like in poor Cory Tschogl's 600-square-foot condo in Palm Springs, California.

Tschogl entered into an agreement through the popular Internet site Airbnb to host a man and his brother for a 44-day period from May 25 through July 8. (Airbnb connects travelers looking for low-cost accommodations with locals who in turn rent them rooms in their homes.)

The man, identified in various reports as Maksym Pashanin and whose Airbnb "verified ID" says he's from Austin, Texas, paid for the first 30 days in advance.

He and his brother moved in, but after 30 days they refused to pay out the balance of their account.

What's more, upon the July end of their rental agreement, they simply refused to leave the condo.

MORE: Pushy guests and porn: Confessions of an Airbnb hostess

Squatters protected under California law

So, if unwanted strangers won't leave, just call authorities and have them booted out, right?

That's where Tschogl's nightmare really begins.

In California, renters who occupy a property for more than 30 consecutive days are considered full-time tenants on a month-to-month lease with rights to occupancy protected under the state's tenant law.

Palm Springs is a popular desert vacation destination. (Condo in dispute not pictured.)
Palm Springs is a popular desert vacation destination. (Condo in dispute not pictured.)

To persuade Pashanin and his brother to leave once the Airbnb reservation contract had expired, Tschogl informed him that she intended to cut off the condo's electricity.

"The guest texted back saying he was legally occupying the condo and that loss of electricity would threaten the work he does at home that brings in $1,000 to $7,000 a day," reported the San Francisco Chronicle.

Pashanin reportedly works as a video game developer. Tschogl says her electricity bills have tripled or even quadrupled since the men moved in.

"The texts threatened to press charges for 'blackmail and damages caused by your negligence and malicious misconduct, including $3,800 PID Espresso machine as well as medical bills for my brother's hospital visit after he got sick here drinking unfiltered tap water,'" reported the Chronicle.

Time to lawyer up

Realizing her legal options were limited, Tschogl contacted Airbnb for help.

According to a Chronicle story on July 19, Tschogl said her numerous email and telephone appeals to Airbnb met with no success.

"I have professional scammers squatting in my condo," an exasperated Tschogl tweeted, while also creating a hashtag #airbnbsquatterswontleave.

Tschogl eventually hired a lawyer and the bizarre story has since gained national attention.

As well as Airbnb's.

According to a July 22 story in USA Today, an Airbnb spokesman says the company now plans to pay Tschogl "the full cost of the reservation and is working with her to provide additional legal support."

Whoever pays, those legal fees may be costly.

Eviction procedures in California can be lengthy and complicated, often taking three to six months to evict a tenant.

Norway expecting terror attempt

Armed police patrol outside the terminal at Oslo Airport on Thursday, July 24.
Armed police patrol outside the terminal at Oslo Airport on Thursday, July 24.
  • Norwegian police say terrorists could strike "in a few days"
  • The information is credible, police say
  • Authorities don't know who is involved or what the plot is
  • Norway has long been threatened by Islamist extremists

(CNN) -- Norwegian officials say they think Islamist terrorists could strike the country within a few days, but they do not know what the plot is.

The Police Security Service "recently received information that individuals affiliated with an extreme Islamist group in Syria may have the intention of carrying out a terrorist action in Norway," the service said in a statement Thursday.

A preliminary investigation strengthened the credibility of the information, the statement said. "We also have information indicating that a terrorist action against Norway is planned to be carried out shortly -- probably in a few days.

"We have no information about who is behind such an attack, how it will be carried out, the target or in what way such an attack will be carried out. ... As the information is not specific and not very concrete but at the same time credible, it is difficult to give advice to the citizens of this country on how to act in this situation."

Security has been increased at airports, train stations, ports and major intersections, according to The Nordic Page, a Norwegian English-language news site.

Norway has long been threatened by Muslim extremists. Al Qaeda leader Ayman Zawahiri mentioned Norway in a recording released back in 2003 -- when he was Osama bin Laden's top deputy, -- that urged Muslims to take a lesson from the 9/11 hijackers and "light a fire under the feet" of the United States, Britain, Australia and Norway by attacking embassies and corporations.

At the time, Norwegian media speculated that al-Zawahiri may have confused Norway with neighboring Denmark. But while Norway did not support the war in Iraq, it did send special forces and fighter planes to Afghanistan as part of the U.S.-led war.

In 2004, Norwegian officials arrested the former leader of an Iraqi Islamic militant group.

In 2006, Norwegian embassies were among the targets of violent protests after newspapers in several countries including Norway published depictions of Islam's Prophet Mohammed.

In 2011, Norway suffered a terrorist attack carried out by Anders Behring Breivik, a right-wing extremist with a hatred of Muslims. Eight people died in a bombing in Oslo, and 69 young people on nearby Utoya island were gunned down.

The following year, the Muslim extremist group Ansar al-Sunna threatened Norway with a 9/11-style attack unless part of the capital, Oslo, was turned into a Muslim nation, the International Business Times reported. "We do not wish to live together with dirty beasts like you," the group wrote in a letter to Norwegian lawmakers and newspaper editors, according to the report.

In its statement Thursday, Norway's Police Security Service said "Extreme Islamism is still the most serious terror threat against Norway. Also, we state that it has for a long time been a strategy to recruit extreme Islamists in war and conflict zones to carry out terrorist actions in Europe, and that Syria at the time being is considered to be the one of the leading arenas for this recruitment."

The threat from Islamist extremists is increasing, police said.

While "a great amount of threats" come in each year, most are not commented on openly, the statement said. But "in the current situation," police said, informing the public "is the right thing to do."

‘Fifty Shades of Grey’ trailer sees ‘Red’

The "Fifty Shades of Grey" movie, adapted from E L James' best-selling erotic novel, will steam up theaters on February 13, 2015. Take a look at the cast:The "Fifty Shades of Grey" movie, adapted from E L James' best-selling erotic novel, will steam up theaters on February 13, 2015. Take a look at the cast:
Dakota Johnson's casting as naive student Anastasia Steele was controversial, but the actress has said that she really "understands" E L James' sensual trilogy. "I think it's an incredible love story," she told <a href='http://insidemovies.ew.com/2013/11/16/dakota-johnson-fifty-shades/' >Entertainment Weekly</a>. The 24-year-old, the daughter of Don Johnson and Melanie Griffith, has previously appeared in "The Social Network," "21 Jump Street" and the short-lived sitcom "Ben and Kate."Dakota Johnson's casting as naive student Anastasia Steele was controversial, but the actress has said that she really "understands" E L James' sensual trilogy. "I think it's an incredible love story," she told Entertainment Weekly. The 24-year-old, the daughter of Don Johnson and Melanie Griffith, has previously appeared in "The Social Network," "21 Jump Street" and the short-lived sitcom "Ben and Kate."
Jamie Dornan was late to the "Fifty Shades" party, as "Sons of Anarchy" star Charlie Hunnam was initially cast to play the wealthy, S&amp;M-loving Christian Grey. But after Hunnam dropped out, Dornan was tapped to fill the role. An Irish model-turned-actor, Dornan is most familiar to U.S. audiences for his work on ABC's "Once Upon A Time."Jamie Dornan was late to the "Fifty Shades" party, as "Sons of Anarchy" star Charlie Hunnam was initially cast to play the wealthy, S&M-loving Christian Grey. But after Hunnam dropped out, Dornan was tapped to fill the role. An Irish model-turned-actor, Dornan is most familiar to U.S. audiences for his work on ABC's "Once Upon A Time."
Eloise Mumford landed the role of Anastasia Steele's best friend, Kate Kavanagh. The 27-year-old has previously appeared in TV series "The River" and "Lone Star." Eloise Mumford landed the role of Anastasia Steele's best friend, Kate Kavanagh. The 27-year-old has previously appeared in TV series "The River" and "Lone Star."
To bring Christian Grey's protective (and totally non-judgmental) bodyguard to life, the "Fifty Shades" team turned to actor Max Martini. You've seen him in TV shows like "The Unit," "CSI" and "Revenge," and on the big screen in "Saving Private Ryan" and "Pacific Rim." To bring Christian Grey's protective (and totally non-judgmental) bodyguard to life, the "Fifty Shades" team turned to actor Max Martini. You've seen him in TV shows like "The Unit," "CSI" and "Revenge," and on the big screen in "Saving Private Ryan" and "Pacific Rim."
Luke Grimes has been cast as Christian Grey's brother Elliot, who also happens to be in love with Ana's roommate/BFF, Kate. Lately, Grimes could be found on "True Blood" as the vampire James, and he also appeared in "Taken 2" and the TV series "Brothers &amp; Sisters."Luke Grimes has been cast as Christian Grey's brother Elliot, who also happens to be in love with Ana's roommate/BFF, Kate. Lately, Grimes could be found on "True Blood" as the vampire James, and he also appeared in "Taken 2" and the TV series "Brothers & Sisters."
For the part of Ana Steele's mom, Carla, "Fifty Shades" has tapped Tony-winner Jennifer Ehle, who recently starred in "RoboCop" and "Zero Dark Thirty."For the part of Ana Steele's mom, Carla, "Fifty Shades" has tapped Tony-winner Jennifer Ehle, who recently starred in "RoboCop" and "Zero Dark Thirty."
Victor Rasuk will play José, Ana's artistic friend who wishes he could be more. Rasuk is best known for his starring work in movies like 2002's "Raising Victor Vargas" and HBO's "How to Make It in America."Victor Rasuk will play José, Ana's artistic friend who wishes he could be more. Rasuk is best known for his starring work in movies like 2002's "Raising Victor Vargas" and HBO's "How to Make It in America."
"Fifty Shades" fans were surprised when the production team announced that singer Rita Ora was cast as Christian Grey's fun-loving and outgoing sister, Mia. Best known for her music and style, Ora is also a budding actress with a few credits to her name. "Fifty Shades" fans were surprised when the production team announced that singer Rita Ora was cast as Christian Grey's fun-loving and outgoing sister, Mia. Best known for her music and style, Ora is also a budding actress with a few credits to her name.
Actress Marcia Gay Harden will portray Christian Grey's mother, Dr. Grace Trevelyan Grey.Actress Marcia Gay Harden will portray Christian Grey's mother, Dr. Grace Trevelyan Grey.
To fill the role of Anastasia Steele's stepfather, Bob Adams, "Fifty Shades" has turned to "Arrow" star Dylan Neal. If you're a Hallmark Channel fan, you'll also recognize Neal from "Cedar Cove," which he stars in with Andie MacDowell. To fill the role of Anastasia Steele's stepfather, Bob Adams, "Fifty Shades" has turned to "Arrow" star Dylan Neal. If you're a Hallmark Channel fan, you'll also recognize Neal from "Cedar Cove," which he stars in with Andie MacDowell.
  • "Fifty Shades of Grey" released its trailer Thursday
  • It gives a glimpse of the book's infamous "Red Room"
  • The movie stars Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan
  • It's scheduled to arrive in theaters on February 13, 2015

(CNN) -- "Fifty Shades of Grey's" infamous "Red Room" has arrived.

The first trailer for the romance drama, which is adapted from E L James' best-selling erotic novel, gives fans a racy hint of what's to come. With a new version of Beyonce's "Crazy In Love" as its soundtrack, the 2½-minute clip closes out with a glimpse into the infamous scarlet boudoir of James' imagination.

Explaining 'Fifty Shades' wild success

Starring Dakota Johnson and Jamie Dornan, "Fifty Shades" tells the story of naive, mousy Anastasia Steele (Johnson), who falls for a handsome billionaire with "singular tastes" named Christian Grey (Dornan).

With so many fans intimately familiar with James' work, the movie has been under intense scrutiny during every step of production, from the choice of screenwriter and director to the leading cast.

When Johnson was announced as the lead actress last year with "Sons of Anarchy's" Charlie Hunnam as Christian Grey, it caused an uproar among fans who were rooting for different actors to land the roles.

Jamie Dornan: 'Fifty Shades' new Christian Grey

Hunnam soon dropped out because of scheduling conflicts, opening the door for Dornan to land the part.

Written by Kelly Marcel and directed by Sam Taylor-Johnson, "Fifty Shades of Grey" arrives in theaters February 13.

48 killed in plane crash

  • 48 people killed and 10 injured when plane tried to land in Taiwanese island
  • TransAsia Airways Flight GE 222 attempted to land twice, state news agency reports
  • Taiwan's transportation minister says there were no casualties on the ground
  • Cause of accident is under investigation

(CNN) -- At least 48 people were killed and 10 injured when a twin-engine turboprop plane crashed while attempting to land in Penghu Islands, according to Taiwan's Civil Aeronautics Administration.

TransAsia Airways Flight GE 222 was preparing to land at Magong Airport in heavy rain on Wednesday and had asked for its second go-around before the accident occurred, according to Taiwan's Central News Agency.

Visibility at the airport during the plane's attempted landing was about 1,600 meters (1 mile) and considered acceptable for landing, Jean Shen, Taiwan's Civil Aeronautics Administration director told reporters.

Map: Magong Map: Magong
Map: MagongMap: Magong
Rescue workers survey the wreckage of TransAsia Airways Flight GE222 on the Taiwanese island of Penghu on Thursday, July 24. The plane was attempting to land in stormy weather but crashed on the island late Wednesday, killing more than 40 people and wrecking houses and cars on the ground. Rescue workers survey the wreckage of TransAsia Airways Flight GE222 on the Taiwanese island of Penghu on Thursday, July 24. The plane was attempting to land in stormy weather but crashed on the island late Wednesday, killing more than 40 people and wrecking houses and cars on the ground.
Rescue workers survey the wreckage on the Taiwanese island of Penghu on July 24. Rescue workers survey the wreckage on the Taiwanese island of Penghu on July 24.
The tail section of planes lies amid rubble where it landed.The tail section of planes lies amid rubble where it landed.
Rescue workers at the wreckage of Flight GE222, a twin-engine turboprop plane. Rescue workers at the wreckage of Flight GE222, a twin-engine turboprop plane.
CNN affiliate ETTV reported the plane crashed into a residential building. The cause of the crash, near Magong Airport, wasn't immediately known.CNN affiliate ETTV reported the plane crashed into a residential building. The cause of the crash, near Magong Airport, wasn't immediately known.
Relatives of passengers are seen at Kaohsiung International Airport in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on July 23. Before Flight GE222 took off from Kaohsiung, it had been delayed due to conditions related to a typhoon, the airline said.Relatives of passengers are seen at Kaohsiung International Airport in Kaohsiung, Taiwan, on July 23. Before Flight GE222 took off from Kaohsiung, it had been delayed due to conditions related to a typhoon, the airline said.
A vehicle is covered in rubble from the wreckage on July 23.A vehicle is covered in rubble from the wreckage on July 23.
Local journalists wait in front of a TransAsia reservations desk at the Taipei Sungshan Airport in Taipei, Taiwan, on July 23.Local journalists wait in front of a TransAsia reservations desk at the Taipei Sungshan Airport in Taipei, Taiwan, on July 23.
A passenger's relative reacts at the airport in Kaohsiung on July 23.A passenger's relative reacts at the airport in Kaohsiung on July 23.
Taiwan plane crashTaiwan plane crash
Was weather a factor in Taiwan crash?
What is a black box anyway?

Transportation officials arrived Thursday morning to investigate the disaster and assist in relief work. The cause of the crash remains unclear and authorities have identified 14 of the 48 killed, according to CNA.

The flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder have been sent to Taipei, the agency reported.

The plane, an ATR 72-500, carried 54 passengers and four crew members.

The domestic flight, which took off from Kaohsiung, Taiwan, had been delayed because of conditions related to a typhoon, the airline said. Typhoon Matmo had struck Taiwan on Wednesday.

Typhoon Matmo threatens mudslides in Taiwan

"Yesterday was an extremely painful day for Taiwan," its President Ma Ying-jeou posted on his official Facebook page, adding that the typhoon had injured 17 people.

"After hearing of the tragedy, and watching relatives break down on TV news, I believe many Taiwanese were the same as me, passing a heartbroken and sleepless night."

Grief in Taiwan

Family members crumpled to the ground, overtaken with grief of losing of loved ones, in footage shown on CNN's affiliate, ETTV.

TransAsia Airways sent families of the victims on a chartered flight to Penghu Islands, the site of the crash, which is located off the west coast of the main Taiwanese island.

The pilots of Flight GE 222 were identified as Lee Yi-liang, who had 22 years of flight experience, and co-pilot Chiang Kuna-hsing who had two-and-a-half years of experience, according to CNA.

Friends of one of the crew members posted on his Facebook page, "Come back" and "Rest in peace."

Also aboard the plane was Yen Ken-chuang, an 82-year-old Taiwanese wood architect, according to the Ministry of Culture's Bureau of Cultural Heritage, CNA reported.

It also reported that a local firefighter, Lee Ming-tsun, 47, was pulled from the wreckage by his colleagues. Lee was a leader of one of the divisions, and was returning from his holiday.

French passengers identified as Jeromine Deramond and Penelope Luternauer died in the plane crash, according to CNA. They were on a one-month exchange program in the field of medicine in Taiwan.

"TransAsia Airways is exhausting all means to assist passengers, victims and families" and working with investigators, an airline statement read.

The airline's president, Chooi Yee-choong appeared briefly at a news conference and bowed in front of news cameras. He choked up as he expressed his sorrow to passengers' families and the public.

"I sincerely apologize," he said.

Crash site

Footage on scene showed the plane had crashed in a residential area and broken into pieces. Witnesses told CNN affiliate ETTV that they saw homes on fire after the plane crashed around 7 p.m. The fallen plane destroyed or damaged 11 houses, EETV reported.

There were no casualties on the ground, said Taiwan's Transportation Minister Yeh Kuang-shih. Five residents were injured, but they were discharged from local hospitals.

The ATR 72-500 plane was delivered to Taiwan's TransAsia Airways from the production line in 2000, according to the aircraft maker.

Xi Jinping, China's president expressed his condolences saying he was "deeply grieved" by the accident.

CNN's Zoe Li, Dayu Zhang and Ashley Fantz contributed to this report.